E-Signature Legal Statement for ApproveMe

Electronic Signatures

Electronic Signatures allow for faster, easier, and paperless signing of electronic documents.  E-signatures help you cut the paperwork and allow you to focus on the tasks at hand.  ApproveMe’s e-signature tool is UETA and E-SIGN compliant and it allows you to you to send, sign, and track legally binding documents.

E-Signature Laws

United States
Legislation passed in the United States allows for the majority of electronically signed documents to have the same legal effect as traditional paper-signed documents.  Two laws passed by Congress, the E-SIGN Act and the Uniform Electronic Transactions Act (UETA) act in unison to ensure the legality of electronically signed documents.  Specifically, E-SIGN ensures that contracts with electronic signatures may not be denied legal effect or ruled unenforceable because they were created digitally.  The UETA works in unison with the E-SIGN Act to ensure that varying state laws do not conflict with the e-signature provisions under E-SIGN.  Currently, UETA has been adopted in 47 of the 50 states within the US. With these laws in place, you can sign with confidence when using the ApproveMe e-signature tool.

Worldwide
The US is not the only country which recognizes that e-signatures will be the norm in the future.  Many countries within the western world have passed legislation that recognizes the legality of e-signatures.  The United Kingdom, Australia, Canada, and the EU have all passed legislation that allows for e-signed documents to be legally binding.

Validity and Enforceability
At ApproveMe we want you to sign with confidence when using our e-signatures tool.  Although the US and the world at large have generally recognized the enforceability and validity of e-signatures, it is important to understand that e-signatures cannot always be substituted in all circumstances.  For instance, trusts and wills in the United States must still be signed on paper.  For this reason, if you have any questions regarding the enforceability or validity of any e-signed documents, you should contact your attorney.

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